I’ve thought about going to WP, upgrading and updating my 10 year old TextPattern plugin code bases, and even gone so far as testing with Ghost, Grav, and similar tools to see what would be a good fit moving forward. I don’t like any of them.

Actually, I’m hacking HTMLy to do what I want; other than multiple-site/domain access, it mostly does what I need, even if I still don’t really like the entire idea of keeping localized Markdown data for my entries.

I’ve already made a semi-dynostatic change to the headers, and will work at adding a replacement for my old contact form. Other than some issues with static page titles not matching URL schemes (HTMLy is still fairly limited), and the afrementoned issues of multiple domains and dynamic SSL support, expect a complete change here for the first time in over a decade.

I may remap old IDs, but don’t expect qbid=42 (Software) to work any longer- it’s been gone for 12 years.

Although my first “Internet Archive” archival was not until December, 1998, I’ve had this domain for 20 years.

Created Date: 1998-03-11

I suddenly feel very, very old.

For what it’s worth, the old procmail (yes, procmail) recipe asking for my resume hasn’t worked for quite awhile. I’m not planning on bringing it back, either.

I have, however, brought back my old signature.

If you’re old enough to have worked on computers in the early 90s, today is a special day.

Michelangelo was probably the first, globally (mis)reported viruses, which was set to activate today, March 6th.

TV and cable were still the form of news for most, and once “Big Television” picked up on this fairly benign thing (It’d make your life difficult, but unlike most nasty viruses, it only wiped your partition table, but didn’t destroy your data- unlike everything else since).

Norton, , and many others dogpiled onto this, offering a free AV tool to remove Michelangelo for some free press. You couldn’t go ANYWHERE to get away from hearing about it. John McAffee said something similar to 5 million computers would be infected (and most users devastated) by it. In the end, it ended up being a couple thousand.

Much like the Y2K bug, there was plenty of press, incredible misinformation, and far, far too much hype.

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